One Stop Biker Shop

A Stony Plain Road Destination

The staff of One Stop Biker Shop with the famous huge book. Photo: Paula E. Kirman.

Paula E. Kirman

One Stop Biker Shop
10007 167 Street
780-443-0543
onestopbikershop.ca

Anyone travelling down 100 Avenue in the west end is sure to have seen the big boot that sits outside of the One Stop Biker Shop. Owner Dan Semaka built that boot – and the building – 40 years ago.

In fact, the store used to be called the Western Boot Factory. While some Western merchandise is still carried, Semaka changed the business to a biker shop about 15 years ago, carrying a variety of helmets, jackets, streetwear, motorcycle boots, and other apparel and gear.

“The west end is where the action is,” says Semaka. “Everyone comes to the west end from out of town. Someone from Grande Prairie is not going to go to the north side or south end to shop.”

Despite COVID-19, business has been booming. Semaka says that over the last few months he hasn’t been able to get stock in fast enough to replenish the shelves. He credits much of this to changing demographics shopping at One Stop Biker Shop. “A younger generation is coming through. They know what they want, and they come here to get it,” he says. “Also, women are taking up biking with a passion and are really enjoying the store,” he adds, saying that sales of women’s helmets have dramatically increased.

A display of helmets for sale. Photo: Paula E. Kirman.

One Stop Biker Shop is a store where customers keep coming back – and sending their family and friends. “My customer loyalty humbles me,” Semaka says, noting that 50 percent of his customers are referrals, while 40 percent are regulars. The other 10 percent drop in when driving by.

The drive-by customers no doubt notice that big boot, making One Stop Biker Shop a “destination store,” Semaka describes. The boot is 39′ 4” – 9′ wide at the top and 16′ long at the sole. At night, it lights up with over 600 feet of neon tubing. Day or night, the boot is ideal for social media photo-ops.

“We’re selling emotion and we’re selling products,” says Semaka, noting the consistently high online reviews the store gets. “When customers walk out of my store, they feel like we did them a favour.”

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